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Art & Economies: Everything Must Go

EVERYTHING MUST GO with artist group Foreign Investment

 

 

Everything Must Go is a playful project by the artist group Foreign Investment. This commissioned project for Chinese Arts Centre, takes a highly engaged approach to connect the Centre and the public. Everything Must Go offers a unique experience for visitors to actively involve themselves as suppliers, producers and investors throughout the different stages of the exhibition.

In the first instance, members of the public are invited to participate by donating unwanted consumer objects for an ‘upgrade.’ Then a group of volunteers recruited locally will work with the artists to gold-gild the objects. The final upgraded product will be available for public to purchase in the art sale at the end of the exhibition.

Information from the Chinese Arts Centre website. To visit project information: Everything Must Go or information on Foreign Investment.

Art & Economies: Architectures of Finance from the Great Depression to the Sub-Prime Meltdown

Damon Rich: Red Lines, Death Vows, Foreclosures, Risk Structures

The American preference for traditional residential design masks a frightening reality: across the globe, individual buildings have been retrofitted to serve as interchangeable nodes in a vast abstract structure, held loosely together by legal and political restraints, made to allow the furious circulation of finance capital.
An installation of models, photographs, videos, and drawings by artist-designer Damon Rich, Red Lines immerses visitors in a landscape of pulsing capital and liquidated buildings, exploring the relation between finance and architecture.

During a year-long residence at MIT’s Center for Advanced Visual Studies, Rich, founder of the Center for Urban Pedagogy (CUP), surveyed the darkening realm of real estate markets: foreclosures, pro-formas, chains of title, block busting, exploding ARMs, and the obscure history of the mortgage.

Damon Rich is an artist and designer. Information from the MIT Center for Advanced Visual Studies

Art & Economies: Socialism Failed, Capitalism is Bankrupt. What comes Next?

Artist Oliver Ressler – Socialism Failed, Capitalism is Bankrupt. What comes Next?

 

Whilst on a residency in Yerevan as part of the project Eat and Work, Oliver Ressler explored political and economic situations in the Republic of Armenia. The project is a 19 minute film and a two channel video installation. The film was recorded in a market called “Bangladesh” where over 1000 traders try to survive in an economically depressed area, where the traders speak of their pre and post socialist lives. Where in the past the state ensured their basic needs were met, a the new state where all safety nets are gone.

More information on the project and to view the film:  Socialism Failed, Capitalism is Bankrupt. What comes Next?

Art & Economies: further reading recommendation

The Wal-Mart Phenomenon: Resisting Neo-liberal Power through Art, Design and Theory

Through our research on the subject of economy and how creative practices explore the subject I came across this rather interesting book.  It is from 2008, so published right about the time that a few countries were facing a ‘financial crises’.  The book is edited by Benda Hofmeyr.

Book synopsis from the publisher Jan Van Eyck Academie:
Against the backdrop of Robert Greenwald’s documentary, WAL-MART. The High Cost of Low Pricethis multi-disciplinary yet cohesive volume calls upon intellectual, artistic and cultural producers themselves to oppose the progressive disappearance of the autonomous worlds of cultural production, cinema, publishing, etc., and therefore, ultimately, of cultural products themselves. It seeks to excavate the present-day workings of neo-liberal power and possible strategies of resistance. The contributors focus both on the documentary and artistic media used to reflect upon these phenomena as well as the actual socio-political and economic processes underlying them and following in their wake from the perspectives of art, design and theory (philosophy and social geography). 

To order:  Jan Van Eyck Academie

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Discovering Shoreditch past and present through film

Inivator Tara Brown explores Shoreditch with the Social Archive One filmmaking project

As someone born and raised in North West London, only moving to the ‘far east’ last summer, Shoreditch first appeared to me as if fully grown and always hipster. And so getting an opportunity to take part in creating a social archive – an economic map of this dynamic area – was definitely of interest to me.

I attended the second workshop on the first day with two other women in the group. After a quick introduction we went off on a flash history tour of Shoreditch and learnt about its transformation from a green and pleasant land to industrial overcrowding, destruction by WWII bombing to the trendy playground it’s become today. The tour was great, if only to orientate myself better. I’m so used to going in one straight line via Rivington Place to Hoxton / Dalston when actually Shoreditch is full of allyways, nooks and crannies to explore.

Back at Rivington Place we were introduced to artist Shiraz Bayjoo who gave us a quick lesson in using technical equipment and we were off, looking for businesses to interview and document. In independent hand bag shops, art galleries and places with no names at all, just addresses we met a variety of people and asked them about their business and the economics of Shoreditch.

Economics is a funny word; it seems to demand expertise and academic excellence on the subject, but in reality affects all of us so strongly we’ve got a view on it. This made all of our subjects shy, but with a bit of pressing we managed to get a sample of their struggles and successes. After a nervous start we all had a turn asking questions and had a rapport with everyone we met. We had our own struggles with the equipment as well – I was a bit rubbish on the camera and the battery ran out part way through the last interview. They were all fantastic and I hope we did them justice… They might even come to the screening – that would be absolutely brilliant.

I left leaving the workshop wanting to have a proper wander around the area, resting in Arnold Circus, site of the world’s first social housing structure, watching reliant robins whizz past by artisan bakers and jewellers. I had seen a new side to the town, a new sense of reality and true grit next to the shiny glass mountain range that is the City. I hope it stays that way, but it’s not Shoreditch’s style – I’ll just have to go along with it she decides to do next.

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Films created as part of Social Archive One: An Economic Forecdast (Shoreditch) will be exhibited at Rivington Place from 19 – 23 July, as well as online. There is a screening party on the evening of 21 July from 6:30 – 9pm, all welcome.

Tara Brown is one of the Inivators, a group of young creatives who work with Iniva’s Education Curator and professional artists to create exhibitions and events in response to Iniva’s main programme. Find out more about the Inivators programme here.

Art & Economies: Feral Trade project by Kate Rich

The Feral Trade Route

The Feral Trade Courier is a live shipping database for a freight network running outside commercial systems. It is a public experiment trading goods over social networks. Its aim is to open up routes for the passage of goods between diverse social settings, along which other information, techniques or individuals can potentially travel. New products are chosen for their portability, shelf-life and capacity for sociability. Feral Trade goods in current circulation include the coffee from El Salvador plus grappa from Croatia, tea from Bangladesh and fresh sweets from the Islamic Republic of Iran.

Kate Rich is an Australian-born artist & trader. At the turn of the century, she  took up the post of Bar Manager at the Cube Microplex, Bristol UK where she launched Feral Trade. She is currently moving deeper into the infrastructure of cultural economy,  developing protocols to define and manage amenities of hospitality, catering, sports and  survival in the cultural realm.

Goldin+Senneby: The Decapitation of Money

The Decapitation of Money, 2010

Artists Goldin+Senneby examine the abstract nature of money in their research and as part of their practice.  In 2010 they created an installation linking two events of the last century, the formation of Georges Bataille’s secret, anti-sovereignty society ‘Acéphale’ (‘Headless’) and the formation of the Eurodollar in the 1950s, when Soviet and Chinese deposited dollars in Europe, evading US financial jurisdiction at the start of the Cold War.  This is one of the first developments of modern finance, where money operates in an virtual or abstract economic space, removed from territorial sovereign boundaries. Exploring the nature of money, its value and its physical nature is complex, elusive and still evolving especially in today’s world of virtual finance. Visit Goldin+Senneby to see more of their work exploring economics and finance through creative means.

Curated by Sandra Terdjman, Kadist Art Foundation, Paris in 2010.  www.kadist.org

Art at the intersection: art & economies

When we talk of economics we are often lead to think about the financial crisis, about banking, about markets and the movements of capital, yet the reach of economic effects extends far beyond this relatively small realm of activity. Economic thinking governs the decisions about the sharing of resources, the division of land and labour, terms of ownership whether that be public or private and the dissemination of wealth and commodities in a world that often denies many the rights to the most basic of life’s needs. During the recent financial crisis some of the stark and unjust effects of the subtle dominance of economics underpinning our lives became very clear.
As the increasing regularity of news stories detail the consequent effects of the weather, of transport and international relationships on the economy we are lead to believe that economics determine our way of life. Yet we rarely focus on the workings or functions of this quiet ruler or consider the decisions that create such a complex system, a system which for many is in accessible.
 
At the Intersection: Art and Economies is a 3 year project in which Iniva will innovate a range of artistic and creative approaches to explore the complex topic of economies.

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